Search Results for: august sander

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Oliver Chanarin’s new installation inspired by Amazon’s distribution centres

Reading Time: 8 minutes Chanarin was poised to embark on a photographic survey of Britain for an installation at SFMOMA, however, confined to his apartment, the artist turned his lens on his partner Fiona Jane Burgess instead. Inspired by August Sander’s photograph the Painter’s Wife, Chanarin has made hundreds of portraits of Burgess at home during lockdown

13 May 2020

December: Books and exhibitions

Reading Time: 5 minutes From an exhibition that draws inspiration from ancient goddesses, to a photobook about Spurs fans, and Crack Magazine’s impressive archive of iconic shoots, below, BJP-online presents a selection of exhibitions and new releases to look out for this month

2 December 2019

Hiro Tanaka on tour and beyond

Reading Time: 7 minutes Over the last decade, Hiro Tanaka has published two photobooks – Dew Dew Its and Chicharron, which won the 2018 Cosmos Arles PDF Award. He has exhibited globally in group shows and photo festivals, and toured the world with punk and hardcore rock bands, where he is often spotted deep in a mosh-pit, camera pumping in the air. But before all that, he was working nine-to-five as a computer technician in Tokyo, Japan, with no interest in photography. Tanaka’s whole career sprouted from a string of unexpected coincidences, beginning with a free flight to America.

7 March 2019

Martin Parr’s Only Human

Reading Time: 5 minutes When the Portrait Gallery was established in London in the mid-19th century, its role was envisioned “to consist of those persons who are most honourably commemorated in British history”. Opening in an era when photography was still a new and untried technology, the National Portrait Gallery (as it later became known) was intended to be the national repository of the images, chiefly paintings and drawings, of those men and, much later, women who represented what was best among the British hierarchy of achievements, skills and aptitudes. Its function was to hold up a mirror to Britain that reflected its qualities back to those who came to observe them, as object lessons about how to aspire to, or more simply respect, the qualities and moral standing of the great and the good.

This conception of the NPG may still be widespread in the public mind, as even Martin Parr thought his work would be an ill-fit for a contemporary exhibition along these lines. “I never thought of myself as a portrait photographer,” he says, “and when I first met Phillip Prodger [NPG’s former head of photographs], I told him I had only a few celebrity portraits. I just put a lightbox together and sent them to him, though I was quite surprised at what I had.” Prodger, however, had other ideas, seeing in Parr the work of a social observer who could also offer a portrait of a nation at a key point in its history. So it is that the NPG put together Only Human, on show from 07 March to 27 May, bringing together some of Parr’s most famous photographs alongside a number of works never exhibited before.

4 March 2019